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How to exercise my "right to be forgotten"?

Team Qwant
Last update: 27/02/2017

If you are an individual, you have a right that results which present information about you be not visible when internet users search your exact name, unless this information has a particular interest for the public. It is what is called the “right to be forgotten” (RTBF), or “right to delisting”.

Because we care about protecting the fundamental rights of our users, Qwant fully respects the right to be forgotten as it was recognized by the European court of Justice (ECJ) in a 2014 decision. As a principle, we remove results that are inaccurate, obsolete, sensitive ou that do you harm, except when there are “particular reasons substantiating a preponderant interest of the public in having, in the context of such a search, access to that information“. It can be the case for instance if you play an important role in public life and that this information can enlight your action or important public discussions.

As a consequence, Qwant must ensure that it respects both your right to privacy and the right of the public to have access to information. These are two equally important fundamental rights, and when assessing a right to be forgotten,  where they are no court order to help us, we have the heavy burden of deciding which right should prevail. We must therefore check for each and every request, first that the request is actually made in compliance with the formal and substantive conditions, then that access to the targeted content bears no preponderant interest for the public.

That is why, even though we apply the right to be forgotten on a very regular basis, Qwant must impose strict formal compliance to RTBF requests. Requests that are not compliant can’t be reviewed.

To exercize your right, or to ask that it benefits a third party that you legally represent, you must fill the following dedicated form:

Once filled, you can send the form with the required attachments to privacy@qwant.com.

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